Chapter 5

Alvington

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Introduction
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5.1 Alvington is located on the lower slopes of the Severn escarpment, about 5 kilometres south-west of Lydney. It is bisected by the busy A.48 trunk route. The village originally developed in a linear form along the main road. This part of the village is still characterised by older terraced properties along the A.48.To the north of the A48, more recent development has taken place off Clanna Lane including an estate of over sixty houses. To the south-east of the main road, development occurred initially in the form of small cottages in large plots. Subsequently, a variety of bungalows and houses have been constructed in this area, although it still retains an open spacious character. The minor roads in this part of the village are generally unsuitable for additional traffic, and their junctions with the A.48 are unsatisfactory. The majority of the village lies within a Conservation Area.
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. 5.2 The village has few services apart from two public houses and a petrol garage with a forecourt shop, which contains the Post Office. The sizeable recreation ground is located on the edge of the village, some distance from the majority of the population. There is little local employment other than agriculture, although Lydney is close by.
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. 5.3 The Parish population increased significantly between 1951 and 1988, from 369 to approximately 500 but has remained static over the past 10 years, associated with a low rate of house building. The village population is estimated to be 350, with a housing stock of about 140. There were outstanding planning consents for 2 dwellings in Alvington in October 1999.
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Development Strategy
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5.4 Alvington is an attractive village set in an attractive and generally open, undulating agricultural landscape. The village is overlooked from the Upper Severn Escarpment so outward expansion of the village into the open countryside would be conspicuous and particularly intrusive. The strategy of the Plan is to safeguard the attractive landscape around Alvington, by means of restricting development in the open countryside beyond the tightly drawn settlement boundary. The strategy will allow residential infilling of one or two dwellings although there are likely to be restricted opportunities for such development. To the south east of the A.48 a more restrictive policy will operate limiting new development to that which would positively improve the built environment.
5.5 The greater part of Alvington is a Conservation Area, reflecting the high quality of the built environment. New development will be expected to complement the attributes of the Conservation Area. Proposals for development may be required to be accompanied by an archaeological appraisal.
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5.6 The large open area in Alvington which adjoins the main road and includes the churchyard provides an important break in the built up area, and offers views into the Conservation Area. This site together with a smaller area to the north is specifically identified on the Inset Map as a protected open area.
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5.7 The busy A48 trunk road has a considerable effect on the quality of the environment due to the large volume of through traffic in the village, and particularly the effect of heavy lorries. A number of traffic management measures and minor highway improvements have been implemented in recent years aimed at reducing the impact of traffic upon the community. These measures need to be reviewed over the Plan period, in conjunction with the County Council.
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Built Environment
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(R) F.Alvington 1

Residential development including infilling will not be permitted within the area identified on the Inset Map. Exceptions will be made only where proposals would result in a significant improvement to the built environment or to the amenity of the area. All new development will be required to complement the established and settled character of the area.

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5.8 To the south-east of the A.48 the settlement form has a distinctive quality, worthy of protection in its own right. Here the settlement form is spacious, often with large areas of open land around and between properties. Important contributions to the character and attractiveness of this area are made by agricultural land, orchards, private gardens and the churchyard. Policy (R)F.Alvington1 is designed to assist with retaining the special character of this area and the restrictions upon further development should help to safeguard the area from pressures for incremental change, including possible widening of the access roads, all of which could lead to an erosion of the character of the area.


Forest of Dean District Local Plan Review, 1st Deposit Draft. July 2000


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