Cleeve Orchard Cider..
Artisan maker of Little Owl cider from the last orchard in Ross on Wye
Life Changing Activi..
Fun, adventure, and personal growth in the Great Outdoors
Gallery 54 - Ross on..
Contemporary abstract art, ceramics and glassware
Staunton
Staunton, "the place of the stones", was the ancient name given by the Anglo-Saxons. The village has stones of ancient origins and of mysterious forms, these are the Buck, Toad, Broad, Long and Queen Stone, all of which have origins dating back to the Bronze and Iron Ages. The Buckstone lies in Highmeadow Woods near the village. The huge rock on the summit of Buckstone Hill is said to have been used in Druid ceremonies, and actually used to rock before it was dislodged in 1885. This point is at 915 feet and one can view panoramic scenery such as views over the Forest of dean, Highmeadow Woods and the Black Mountains. The woods around Staunton are not actually part of the Royal Forest but are part of the Manor of Staunton.

In the churchyard of All Saints Church, you will see the grave of David Mushet (1772-1847). With his son, he developed interest in the iron industry of Dean and laid much of the groundwork for the impending steel industry in Britain.
Churches

This is one of the oldest churches on the borders of the Forest of Dean, built in the early part of the 12th century, however, alterations and additions have been made throughout the middle ages and a 19th century restoration was also carried out. The central tower is the most striking external feature as well as the sundial on the south porch.

One of the most interesting features inside the church is the corkscrew staircase which leads to the unusual c1500 stone pulpit. There are also two fonts, one of which is 15th century whereas the other is believed to be a hollowed out Roman altar. Some medieval glass survives in a tiny upper window in the chancel east wall. Also in the chancel there is a 13th century tombstone with an incised cross and chalice. The churchyard contains a memorial to David Mushet who was a metallurgist whose experiments revolutionised the steel industry. Also in the churchyard, there are little almshouses given by benedict Hall in the 17th century. 

 Ancient standing stones can also be seen in the parish.

Nearby Accommodation
Graygill
Large house in 11 acres of pasture and gardens. Quietly situates off A4136 between Coleford and Monmouth. Ideal touring, walking cycling and riding - stabling available.
Kilmorie Farm
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